Paul Rasmussen

Queensland’s VET Investment Plan – Moving forward 2016 and onwards

Posted by | Certificate II Guarantee, Government Funding, Paul Rasmussen | No Comments

Queensland’s VET Investment Plan – Moving forward 2016 and onwards

For those of you who are regular readers of this blog, you will know that for the most part I have been a supporter of the Queensland Governments VET investment plan both under the previous and current governments.  I also think it is necessary for me to indicate at this point that the organisation that I work for is a PQS under both VET investment and User Choice before I go any further however.  So with the end of the 2015-16 financial year approaching, yes it is almost the end of February folks, this means that the current plan is set for review.  I therefore thought that it might be a worthwhile time to have a look at the program and what possible changes might be useful and not useful in the next version of the plan.

My first thought is a simple one.  The PQS system, where providers are required to meet and adhere to additional guidelines and regulations in order to be able to access funding under VET investment is a great one.  Access to entitlement style funding, should have additional requirements attached to it, over and above simply being an ASQA registered provider.

My second thought is also a simple one.  Please don’t break something that is working.  I would appeal to the government not to follow the route of South Australia in thinking that portioning off a large amount of the available funding and earmarking it as TAFE only funding is a good idea.  We need to support TAFE and we need to have a vibrant and effective public provider, but cordoning off large portions of a funding program and making it TAFE exclusive is not the way to go.  Neither is I think putting in place quota systems, unless we are very very sure of the numbers of people we are going to need in particular areas over the coming years.  The system that we currently have is not broken, it is working and with a few modifications could be even more effective.  Throwing it out and trying to start over, or trying to massively overhaul the program is I think a recipe for disaster.

I guess what I am saying, is something that I have said before, I think Queensland has got there funding initiative pretty right, particularly if we look at the whole picture.

  • Skilling Queenslanders for Work – While only just starting up will really help to assist that segment of learners that are extremely disadvantaged, through programs supported by community services organisations.
  • User Choice –  Apprenticeships and Traineeships are important, in fact vital to business and industry and need to be continued to be funded
  • Certificate III Guarantee – This is a fantastic program which needs to be continued both for public and private providers, as with the SQFW program, this program really assists to get jobs and to change their circumstances.  Prioritised funding for those courses where there is high need and good employment outcomes continues to be the way to go and currently for the most part I think the government has the mix right.  The only tweak that could be made would be where a person has an extremely old qualification in a different field of education and wants to move into a new vocational area.  Being able to support this move for people who are not currently employed would make the program stronger.
  • Higher Skills – I am a fan of this program, the ability for people who are currently working and who only possess entry level qualifications to receive a subsidy to gain a higher level qualification or skill set is fantastic and has at least in our sector (community services) enabled significant numbers of people to improve their employment outcomes.
  • Funding for TAFE – TAFE needs to be funded, even if that funding is simply support to maintain their infrastructure and resources.  But keep it separate from the other funding and subsidy programs however, provide them with what they need to be strong and competitive, but also keep choice in the system.  Choice is actually vital to producing a vibrant public system.

On a side note with regards to the Certificate III and Higher Skills programs, having a mandatory student contribution is vital, however I would caution against setting what that contribution should be.

Therefore please @YvetteDAth and the Queensland Department of Education, lets keep what we have and keep it working.  Lets not go the way of some of the other states and throw the baby out with the bathwater.

Anyway that’s just my opinion.

Workforce participation, Training for the long term unemployed and the needs of industry.

Posted by | Job Services, Long term Unemployed, Paul Rasmussen, Training Programs, Work skills | No Comments

This is a repost of an article written late last year by our National Training Manager – Paul Rasmussen.  The original article can be found here.

 

I attended a very interesting breakfast earlier in the week, (thanks to the wonderful people at Busy@work)  where the central topic of discussion was around the subject of how to better unemployed and underemployed people with industry needs in order to facilitate meaningful return to employment.  Aside from a range of other issues that were discussed one thing that was raised a number of times was the gap between the skill level of, in particular long-term unemployed, and to be even more particular long-term unemployed youth, and the skill needs of industry and business.

So I got to thinking what are those basic skills that employers, large or small, need job seekers, particularly those coming from medium to long-term unemployment to have, in order for the employer to feel comfortable employing them initially and to retain them.  so I have come up with a list of what I think those really, really basic skills are, so here goes:

  1. Punctuality – The ability to be at work and ready to start work, at the time their day/shift/whatever begins.  I was always taught when I was young and in my first couple of jobs, both when I was at high school and in the workforce, that you should be there 10-15 minutes before your starting time so that you were ready and able to start work on time.
  2. Appropriate clothing and accessory choices – All work places have rules and expectations, some safety related, some organisational and culturally related.  Insisting that you wear a long sleeve shirt,  that your uniform is clean and or ironed, that you removed some of your piercings, are not unreasonable requests.  when I was in the police force in the very early days of my career (it was my first job) our Senior Sargent used to check our uniforms, shoes etc, to make sure that we looked professional and well turned out before we went out in public, representing the organisation.
  3. Basic maths – If you cant figure out that $1.60 is the change out of $10.00 when I purchase an $8.40 item, without the use of a cash register or calculator, then you probably shouldn’t be working in a role that requires basic maths, and it shouldn’t be up to an employer to give you training in basic maths.
  4. Basic appropriate communication/language skills – I am not suggesting that new job seekers  or those returning from long-term unemployment need to have the communications skills of senior executive or master facilitator, but they do need to be able to talk to customers, in a polite, respectful, understandable manner.
  5. Basic customer service skills – I don’t care what job you are in, you have customers, they might be internal or external, but you have them, everyone needs to have some level of customer service skills, even if it is don’t swear at the customer when they ask you a question, because it drags you away from your txt/facebook conversation.
  6. Basic understanding of business – Really all I am saying here is understand that a business is not going to change its policy on facial piercing, simply because it is your preference to have a three-inch, pointed, metal stud protruding from the center of your forehead.  It is an understanding that they work for someone else and that working there comes with a set of rules and expectations,both from the business and from the clients of the business.

Now certainly there are going to be roles out there that are appropriate for the groups of people that I am talking about here that require, different or higher levels of skills to the ones listed, but for most entry-level positions, having these six basic skills, place those candidates head and shoulders above all of the others.

How do we give youth, long-term unemployed and other groups, these skills.  Is it something that young people should have been taught at school,  (particularly maths and communications), or come from parents and role models (punctuality and politeness), some of it should and for those that have it, it probably has.  Unfortunately though, for some long-term unemployed, whether they are in the youth demographic or not, even if they did have these skills at some point (and a lot of them probably didn’t), they have dissipated with lack of use over time.

The bigger issue for me, (and this seemed to be a bit of a theme at the breakfast) is how do we teach these people these skills.  In Australia we have government-funded organisations, whose roll it is to assist people with entering or reentering the workforce, particularly those who have been unemployed for a significant period of time, but still we seem to have this situation where candidates turn up for interviews and ongoing employment without even the basic skills i have listed and then we wonder why business and employers either don’ take them on in the first place or only retain them for a short period of time.

I would really like to hear what people think, both about my basics skills list and any ideas about how we might better be able to increase these skills in the people that need them most.

Language Literacy and Numeracy Unit now available online – TAELLN411

Posted by | Courses, Paul Rasmussen, Training Programs, Units of Competency | No Comments

Language Literacy and Numeracy Unit now available online

 

Spectrum Training has commenced delivery of TAELLN411 – Addressing Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy Skills Unit of Competency as either online or correspondence.  This Unit provides participants with underpinning knowledge and a range of workplace activities to develop and strengthen their skills in addressing LLN in their training environments.  After the successful completion of this unit participants will be issues a Statement of Attainment.

 In order to make obtaining this unit as cost effective as possible for participants Spectrum Training is offering this unit for the  $125 per person when completed online, so 

ENROL NOW

 

Ready to enrol? ENROL NOW